At What Speed Should We Practice?

Slowly, slowly….

Slowly, slowly….

I’m going back a few years to 2009 when Daniel Coyle launched his first book “The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How”.

You may recall the flurry of excitement that accompanied the book’s release because the content gave marketing and educational pundits a new milestone discovery to promote.

If you’re not already aware, the essence of the ‘The Talent Code’ is that mastering any skill can be done much more effectively by practicing it very slowly, only increasing the pace as and when the neural pathways in your brain have been well established. This creation of behaviour patterns is called ‘deep practice’.

Invest 4:03 minutes into your future by listening to Daniel Coyle speak. Click here 

You won’t have to register with the Spartak Tennis Club to improve your backhand or spend a few terms at the Meadowmount School of Music to make your violin sound less squeaky because you now know at least the basics of how to conduct your practice.

There is of course more to it but by applying this approach to your methods of practice, coaching and self-motivation will result in your weekend golf game scores or your tennis serves improving because you’ll have found a working blueprint for overcoming life’s uphill struggles.

In 2012 Daniel came out with another best seller “The Little Book Of Talent” and other books after that.  You can enjoy a visual breakdown of some of Coyle’s ideas here in these 1:30 minute YouTube clips:

THE LITTLE BOOK OF TALENT by Daniel Coyle - Tip# 14  Take off your watch 

THE LITTLE BOOK OF TALENT by Daniel Coyle - Tip #21  Think in Vivid Images

THE LITTLE BOOK OF TALENT by Daniel Coyle - Tip# 42  Coach with Vivid Information

There’s a practical lesson for schools in this approach.

Think how you might apply this?  How your children might benefit from it for their exams? Get that pen and paper out and start writing down ideas!

Graeme Dinnen